In most every city and town in the U.S., billions of microscopic critters swim in a slurry of liquid household waste.

As gross as it sounds, this is far from a nightmare. These bacteria and other organisms reside at sewage treatment plants, and they live for our waste, lovingly gobbling it up and breaking it down as part of the water cleaning process. Sewage treatment plants and the microscopic life that lives there are the tiny but mighty backstop preventing raw sewage from entering our rivers and waterways.

Caldwell Wastewater Treatment

Tony Harmon, superintendent of the Caldwell wastewater treatment plant, talks about the treatment process during a tour of the facility Wednesday.

Caldwell Wastewater Treatment

Tony Harmon, superintendent of the Caldwell wastewater treatment plant, talks about the treatment process during a tour of the facility Wednesday. 

Caldwell Wastewater Treatment

Treatment tanks sit mostly empty at the Caldwell wastewater treatment plant.

Caldwell Wastewater Treatment

Tony Harmon, superintendent of the Caldwell wastewater treatment plant, talks about the process while standing in a UV treatment area Wednesday.

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