Retired U.S. Army Lt. Col. Kim Anglesey
Submitted photo Retired U.S. Army Lt. Col. Kim Anglesey plans to open a translation service after attending a workshop aimed at helping veterans break into the business world.

    POCATELLO — Retired U.S. Army Lt. Col. Kim Anglesey was so impressed when he attended a new program aimed at veterans and veterans with disabilities, he wanted to share the experience and the resource with other veterans.

    Founded by the Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University in 2007, the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans helps soldiers returning from active duty find their niche in civilian life.

    “This program is like earning an MBA in 10 days,” Anglesey said.

    Today six universities are involved in the program.

    Anglesey said the veterans workshop, held July 10-18 at the University of California in Los Angeles, was aimed at helping veterans break into the business world.

    “They put the very best instructors there, and there was a constant parade of experts,” Anglesey said.

    More than 200 veterans have completed the course.

    Fluent in Spanish and Portuguese, Anglesey plans to open a translation service in Southeast Idaho, and he said the information he obtained at the workshop will be valuable.

    “They won’t do it for you,” he said. “But they’ll be there for you.”

    Anglesey, who is listed as 80 percent disabled, said many veterans struggle to find a job or vocation that offers the same level of responsibility and sense of belonging that they experienced in the military.

    For disabled veterans, it’s even more challenging because many have frequent doctor appointments related to their disabilities. Or their disabilities prevent them from performing certain work-related activities.

    Overall, disabled veterans from the Gulf War-era have a higher unemployment rate than non-veterans. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 21 percent of veterans who served in the Gulf War-era, have a service-connected disability.

    Anglesey said the EBV focuses on the skills that make them good soldiers and apply that to business.

    A native of Pocatello, Anglesey and his wife, Diane, have been married 31 years. They five children and five grandchildren. When he’s not working, he enjoys playing racquetball and studying his family history.

    For more information about the program, go to http://whitman.syr.edu/ebv.